Sunday, May 17, 2009

Enemy

Somebody save me from myself I am my own worst enemy
Somebody save me from myself for I have no inner peace

I’ve got all the trappings that the poor and lonely could ever want
I’m not the best at anything but I’m good at an awful lot
I wake up every morning with all my fingers and my toes
But I couldn’t smell the flowers if they were placed before my nose
I often felt that all I need is to surround myself with love
To that I’ve built a fortress but somehow that’s just not enough

Somebody save me from myself I am my own worst enemy
Somebody save me from myself for I have no inner peace
The more I seem to learn the less I know about myself
Someone throw me a line, somebody save me from myself

I never know just what it is that tears my soul apart
Is it the ghosts inside my head or an aching in my heart
I’d lay down the lines that bare my soul if I could only find the time
The thing about time as I grow old is that a lot less of it is mine
I must be sick inside myself because around me all is well
Somebody help me with this burden ‘fore it drags me straight to hell

Somebody save me from myself I am my own worst enemy
Somebody save me from myself for I have no inner peace
The more I seem to learn the less I know about myself
Someone throw me a line, somebody save me from myself


Sunday Scribblings - 163,Disconnected.    Disconnected from your own reality.  Wondering how your feelings defy logic. To be your own worst enemy?  This song was recorded for the country rock act, Country Blue.  Press play on the player below to listen.  It's best enjoyed with a cold beer and a shot of JD....




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17 comments:

  1. i can relate to this.. i've been there.

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  2. Simply wonderful! I love seeing poetry put to music.

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  3. i couldn't get any sound but i love the words and can surely relate to being my own worst enenmy - keep your friends close and your enemies closer, right? --- and get out of our own damned way now and again!!!

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  4. Loud and clear, I hear! Excellent words and song.

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  5. This is deep and so questioning. Excellently done.

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  6. Great words, great music, great way for me to wake up. Thanks for leading me to these words.

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  7. Floreta - I wrung my guts like an old dishrag getting this one out. It still amazes me how many people say just that.

    Tammy - Thank you!

    Danni - Sorry for that, hope you can try again later. Yes! I've trying to get out of my own damned way forever.

    Tumblewords - Thanks for that!

    Tony - Who says country songs are all about dead dogs and jilted lovers?

    Old Grizz - Glad you liked it! I still need my cup o' joe, though.

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  8. Michael,

    Wow so powerful! You've described my last two months perfectly. Amazing words!

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  9. i am so glad i came here!
    or else i would have missed something big!

    http://whenhekissesher.wordpress.com/2009/05/16/disconnected/

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  10. SO not surprised this is a song. It reads perfectly like one (that's a high compliment!). And the sentiment... of *course* we can all relate. We're human and you've captured the essence of humanity perfectly.

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  11. Dusty - Thanks for the compliment! It seems that self penitence is universal.

    AD - I'm so glad you came here too!!!

    Susan - I'm diggin' your high compliments!

    Jeeves - Gracias. Muchas gracias

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  12. Michael: I likes it, straight up and in a twisted way, too. It's an interesting song of contrasts for me: the lyrics lay out the soul search and the disarray, but the music is upbeat, as if the song carries the very hope sought for.

    Whither this torch and twang, Jersey Boy? I know about the Dallas sojourn, but still, I doubt the Metroplex gave you the twang. It's funny, my wife, Marlton/Philly girl, first generation Armenian American at that, sounds her very singing best when singing Armenian folksongs, Randy Travis, or blues.

    Peace/out, brother.

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  13. Paschal - That is very insightful. This was a song that was lyrics first. My first go at it was a bit of a dirge in a minor key. But I found the whole thing was just too heavy for me to even be able to sing it. I actually was trying to personify Mick Jagger, a la "Dead Flowers", as a means of humoring myself through the subject matter. It pretty much stayed in my songbook collecting dust. However, in 2001, I moved back to Jersey and my cousin was hot on doing a country rock album. So we collaborated and I dusted "Enemy" off, with some editing, and recorded it for Country Blue.

    As for the twang, I am something a vocal chameleon. One of my boyhood heroes was Mel Blanc. When I would visit NJ from TX, people would call me on sounding like a Texan. By the time I returned to Dallas, folks there would say I've got my Jersey up. I turned it on in the vocal booth to try to country-up the song. Ironically, I hated country music while in Dallas. I was immersed in the blues scene there and wanted nothing of it. But that door opened and I went through it. It was a great experience for me.

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  14. Well, versatile music man, I did enjoy this with an ice cold beer. I know I cain’t do the JD thing in the frame of mind I’m in, but all you have to know is I enjoyed the blind-to-the-flowers of it, the never-knowing-what’s-tearing-my-soul-apart of it, the ghosts-inside-my-head of it, and the heart-aching and the straight-to-hell of it.

    At the beginning of this year I wrote to a dear friend, “…i’m such an enemy to me…i wish you everything, love, me.” He’s a guitarist and he wrote back, “I shared the lines you wrote to me with [my daughter] and we both looked at each other and said ‘That is a line in a song…’” Just teach me guitar and I’d be off, eh? LOL.

    Anyway, after this country piece and listening to a couple of your 3WW recordings, I’ve come to the understanding that country, blues, rock, speaking poems, it doesn’t matter, it’s your voice : )

    Miss A

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  15. Miss A fer Awesome! - Great minds think alike! And that does sound like a line in a song. Like the lines I'd like to lay down if I could only find the time. I got some versitilitudes brewing in my studio. I just keep getting strung in different directions. Not a complaint, just se la vie. Nice to hear ya. You and Paschal have had me thinking Nawlin's this week. I gotta make me some gumbo!

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  16. You do that, Mister. Make that gumbo, that is. And make sure you record you talkin’ your way through it: “Mince a large onion, a few ribs of celery and a large bell pepper—the Cajun “Holy Trinity”—and reserve in a separate container…” so’s I can hear it, k? ; )

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